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Egipto. Descubren una estatua que corresponde a una reina faraónica de hace 3400 años

Egipto. Descubren una estatua que corresponde a una reina faraónica de hace 3400 años

Fotos:(1) This picture released by the Egyptian Antiquities Department on Monday 23 January 2006 shows a 1.6-metre high black granite statue of Queen Tiye, the wife of 18th dynasty (circa 1539-1292 B.C.) King Amunhotep III and the mother of Akhenaten. It was discovered during work by an American archaelogical mission from Johns Hopkins University just outside of Luxor at the Temple of Mut. The Pharoah Akhenaten changed the worship of multiply Gods to the worship of one God symbolized by the sun. In this statue the queen wears the headdress typical of royalty with its cobras and an eagle. It is topped by a crown with 11 cartouches on which the name Amunhotep is carved in hieroglyphics. EPA/SUPREME COUNCIL ON ANTIQUITIES. (2) This picture released by the Egyptian Antiquities Department on Monday 23 January 2006 shows a 1.6-metre high black granite statue of Queen Tiye, the wife of 18th dynasty (circa 1539-1292 B.C.) King Amunhotep III and the mother of Akhenaten. EPA/SUPREME COUNCIL ON ANTIQUITIES


Un equipo de expertos estadounidenses ha descubierto la estatua de una reina de la XVIII dinastía faraónica (1554-1304 a.C.), en la localidad monumental de Luxor, a 726 kilómetros al sur de El Cairo.

Asi lo informó hoy a EFE el arqueólogo Sabri Abdelaziz, uno de los responsables del Consejo Supremo de Antiguedades (CSA), que precisó que el hallazgo fue hecho por expertos de la universidad norteamericana de Johns Hopkins en excavaciones realizadas en el templo en la zona de Karnak.

La estatua, que representa a la reina Tiyi, esposa del faraón Amenhotep III, cuya dinastía fue una de las tres que gobernaron durante el Imperio Nuevo (1554-1075 a.C), está esculpida en granito negro, precisó Abdelaziz.

"La antigüedad, que tiene una altura de 1,60 y 44 centímetros de largo y ancho, respectivamente, y que sólo le faltan los pies y uno de los brazos, tiene en su parte superior una corona en la que tiene esculpido el nombre de su esposo", manifestó el responsable del CSA.

También, agregó Abdelaziz, la estatua lleva sobre el rostro tres serpientes cobra y una pequeña águila, y sobre su espalda dos columnas con inscripciones en alfabeto jeroglífico. En enero de 2003, otra estatua de la reina "Tiyi" fue hallada en Luxor por un equipo arqueológico egipcio-europeo durante los trabajos de excavación realizados en torno a los colosos de Memnom, en la orilla oeste del río Nilo.

"La estatua, de casi tres metros de alto, es considerada una maravilla artística y de incalculable valor, ya que rara vez los antiguos egipcios erigían estatuas de tamaño natural de las reinas junto a las de sus esposos", explicaron entonces los arqueólogos.

El faraón Amenhoteb III, hijo del rey Tutmés IV, construyó su capital en Tebas y desde allí consolidó la supremacía egipcia en Babilonia y Asiria. Entre sus más destacados monumentos figuran el Templo de Luxor, el Gran pilón de Karnak y los colosos de Memnon.


Fuente: Agencia EFE / ABC.es, 24 de enero de 2006
Enlace: http://sevilla.abc.es/sevilla/pg060124/actualidad/
cultura/arqueologia/200601/24/estatua_egipto_reina_faraona.asp


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(2) Cairo - Egyptian antiquity officials announced Monday the discovery near the southern city of Luxor of a statue believed to be of a queen who was the mother of the pharaoh that shifted the kingdom towards monotheism.

Queen Tiye, the wife of 18th dynasty (ca. 1539 - 1292 BC) King Amunhotep III and the mother of Akhenaten, was immortalized in a 1.6- metre black granite statue discovered during work just outside of Luxor at the Temple of Mut by an archaeological mission from Johns Hopkins University of Baltimore in the US.

Secretary General of the Supreme Council of Antiquities Zahi Hawass described the statue as being generally well-preserved although missing one arm and both lower legs.

The queen wears the headdress typical of royalty with its cobras and an eagle. It is topped by a crown with 11 cartouches on which the name Amunhotep is carved in hieroglyphics.

The statue dates from a time when a trend towards more lifelike depiction of the human form was emerging - an approach that reached its zenith in the pharaonic era during Akhenaten’s reign.

Excavation activities are currently at their peak in Egypt, as most digs take place in the south where winter weather is more conducive to such work.


Fuente: © 2006 dpa - Deutsche Presse-Agentur / Monsters and Critics.com, 23 de enero de 2006
Enlace: http://science.monstersandcritics.com/news/
article_1078617.php/Ancient_1.6-metre_granite_statue_
of_Egyptian_queen_found_in_Luxor


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Contact: Amy Lunday
amylunday@jhu.edu
443-287-9960
Johns Hopkins University

Johns Hopkins team discovers statue of Egyptian queen

A Johns Hopkins University archaeological expedition in Luxor, Egypt, has unearthed a life-sized statue, dating back nearly 3,400 years, of one of the queens of the powerful king Amenhotep III.

The statue, which dates to between 1391 and 1352 B.C.E., was uncovered earlier this month by the expedition’s director, Betsy Bryan, Johns Hopkins professor of Egyptian art and archaeology. Bryan and a graduate student, Fatma Talaat Ismail, were clearing a portion of the platform of the temple of the goddess Mut in Luxor, an area dating to about 700 B.C.E. The statue, which was lying face down in the ground, appeared to have been used as building rubble, Bryan said.

The statue’s back pillar was unearthed first and led Bryan to believe briefly that it dated from a far later period, since an inscription there was clearly made in the 21st Dynasty, about 1000 B.C.E., for a very powerful queen Henuttawy.

"The statue, however, when it was removed, revealed itself as a queen of Amenhotep III, whose name appears repeatedly on the statue’s crown," Bryan said. She said she theorizes that perhaps this statue is of the great Queen Tiy, wife of Amenhotep III and mother of the so-called heretic king Akhenaten, who came to the throne as Amenhotep IV but later changed his name because of his rejection of the god Amen in favor of the sun disk Aten.

"Tiy was so powerful that, as a widow, she was the recipient of foreign diplomatic letters sent to her from the king of Babylonia in hopes that she would intercede with her son on behalf of the foreign interests," Bryan said. "Some indications, such as her own portraits in art, suggest that Tiy may have ruled briefly after her husband’s death, but this is uncertain."

For reasons relating to inscriptions found on it, the statue of the queen definitely may be dated to the late years of Amenhotep III’s 38-year rule, Bryan said.

"The king did marry his own daughter, princess Sit-Amun, and made her his great royal wife as Tiy became more elderly," Bryan said. "Thus the statue could also represent Sit-Amun as queen. Research on this highly detailed and exquisitely worked large-scale statue is only beginning. More story will be revealed."

The discovery was made during Bryan’s 11th annual excavation at the Mut Temple Precinct, where she and her students are exploring the Egyptian New Kingdom (1567 to 1085 B.C.E.). The crew shares its work with the world through "Hopkins in Egypt Today," an online diary featuring images by university photographer Jay VanRensselaer and captions by Bryan, detailing the day-to-day life on an archaeological dig. It is located at http://www.jhu.edu/neareast/egypttoday.html. The site will be updated to include details of this new find.

Because Bryan is still at the excavation, her press availability is limited. For information, contact Amy Lunday at 443-287-9960 or amylunday@jhu.edu

Fuente: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-01/jhu-jht012406.php

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1 comentario

susana jorqura -

me gusta mucho la arquitectura y tambiem astronomia son unas de las cosas mas importante que hay que estudiar y a prender
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